[Variety Reviews]

Boy Trouble



MOVIES TELEVISION MAIN PHOTOS MUSIC IN PRINT ON-LINE


Previous Next Review Index


April 5th 1939
Boy Trouble

Paramount production and release. Features Charles Ruggles, Mary Boland. Directed by George Archainbaud. Adapted by Laura and S.J. Perelman from story by Lloyd Corrigan and Monte Brice: camera, Henry Sharp. editor. Alma Maerorie. At Paramount, Brooklyn, April 1, '39. Running time: 75 MINS.
Homer C. Fitch....................Charlie Ruggles
Sybil Fitch.......................Mary Boland
Butch.............................Donald O'Connor
Patricia Fitch....................Joyce Mathews
Wyndham Wilson....................John Hartley
Joe...............................Billy Lee
Mr. Snively.......................Andrew Tombes
Dr. Benschlager...................Dick Elliott
Mrs. Jepson.......................Zeffie Tillbury
Mrs. Moots........................Sarah Edwards
Mr. Pike..........................Harlan Briggs
Mother............................Josephine Whittell
Boy...............................Sonny Bupp
Mrs. Ungerleljer..................Georgia Caine
Magistrate........................Russell Hicks
Fat Mother........................Grace Hayle
Mr. Tatum.........................Charles Trowbridge
Grocer Bradley....................Spencer Charters

_______

..... Good old hokum with an emotional wallop that almost lifts it out of the 'B' class. Picture will satisfy nearly all types of audiences. It's a sure bet for the family trade.
..... Director Archainbaud rates praise for his handling of a story that expertly mixes pathos with laughter and keeps the action going with plenty of slants and unexpected twists.
..... Mary Boland and Charles Ruggles are co-featured and share honors with two youngsters, Donald O'Connor and Billy Lee. Performances all around are uniformly good, but in the last analysis the pictures leans heavily on Ruggles, who scores in a tailor-made part out of which he squeezes every ounce of effect.
..... The Fitches are a small-town childless couple, pretty much set in the even tenor of their domestic ways. Mr. Fitch (Ruggles) is a Caspar Milquetoast, easily upset when his routine habits are disturbed and with an unhappy faculty of blundering into situations not of his making.
..... Mrs. Fitch (Miss Boland), thinking only of her husband's happiness is misled into adopting an orphan (Lee) and also a homeless waif (O'Connor). Fitch, who takes a daily browbeating in the department store where he works finds his peaceful home retreat completely upset by the newcomers. He orders Mrs. Fitch to get rid of the youngsters, and sets his heart against showing any signs of affection or understanding for them.
..... Numerous other events in the meantime conspire against him and when the orphanage takes Billy Lee back for a more suitable adoption and the other lad also takes to the high road when he finds he is not wanted, Fitch shows signs of weakening. Other complications, such as the loss of his job and the crucial illness of little Billy brings things to a high emotional pitch with everything finally working out happily in the end.
..... Ruggles' best scene is that at the bedside of the sick child when he gives the child a reason to live and tunrs the crisis favorably.
..... Exhibitors can use more pictures of this type.



Previous Next Review Index



All reviews are copyright by and their repsective reviewers. Unfortunately their web site doesn't have anything older than two years, so consider us your local library.


MOVIES TELEVISION MAIN PHOTOS MUSIC IN PRINT ON-LINE

T 'N' T INDEX T 'N' T TOP TENS PORT CHUCKLES STAR TREK PETER LORRE

You have reached http://muppetlabs.com/~davidj/tnt/oconnor/variety/trouble.htm

Disclaimer: We are in no way officially sanctioned by or connected to Donald O'Connor, or anyone else for that matter. None of the content of this website is meant to infringe upon any copyrights held by studios, companies, authors, other web site owners or stray individuals.

Anything original is copyright 1999 by Teresa and Tracy Murray (a.k.a. T 'n' T).

Please send us lots and lots of e-mail at tntmur@aol.com

Number of people convinced the critics are usually wrong: